How to write a log file in stata

The default in Stata is to save the file with the extension. But you should strive for simplicity anyway.

convert log file to pdf

There are a number of benefits to using do-files. If you are working with the same data over a few sessions as is often the caseyou can use the command log using [logname], append which will pick-up the log named [logname] right where it left off. The file will be found in your working directory.

log transformation of variable in stata

At the end, we use type command to show the content of mylog. After the log file is open, typing log off will suspend the log file, log on will resume the log file and log close will close your log file.

Stata log file already open

Saving contents using a log file One way to save all of the results from your Stata session, is to use a log file. If you are working with the same data over a few sessions as is often the case , you can use the command log using [logname], append which will pick-up the log named [logname] right where it left off. Here are three examples of the use command, one from a data set in the current working directly, one from the internet and one from a jump drive in a different working directory. Within this file, Stata will assume that each line is a new command unless you tell it otherwise. To separate notes and comments from commands in do-files, begin the line with an asterisk. Once you have opened a log file, you may temporarily suspend the output being written to it by log off Not surprisingly, to have further output written to the log file you have to switch log on A different thing is to close a log file with log close To have further output written to a log file, you have to specify again a log file with "log using Create a Log File to Store Results The first thing your do file should do is set up a log file which will store its results.

To stop logging and close the log, type log close into the command window. As you can see, Stata literally dumps everything in the Results window to this file. The advantage of translate is that unlike a log file that has to be opened before you run the commands, translate captures all of the output that has already been produced.

One thing that often confuses new Stata users is that Stata works with three things at the same time: your data, your commands, and your results.

That will open the do file in Stata's do file editor and set Stata's working folder to the folder that it is stored in.

stata log command

You probably may also indicate a path for the log file. For information on how to increase the size of the scroll buffer, see How can I make the Results window hold more results? Here are three examples of the use command, one from a data set in the current working directly, one from the internet and one from a jump drive in a different working directory.

Stata log()

Creating log files In addition to recording all of your commands in a do-file, you can also have Stata create a copy of everything that is sent to the Results window, with the exception of graphs. Note that you have to open the log file before output can be written to it. You can also start, suspend, resume and close logs using the log command. Also available are commands for changing the display of the p-value and of the test statistics t-values, z-values and the like ; the commands are set pformat and set sformat, respectively. That tells Stata that the next line is part of the same command. This will allow you to open the log file in Stata, but other programs will not read this type of file. Finally, you can add comments to your logs as you go.
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Save outputs in an external file in Stata